Eating Okonomiyaki in Asakusa, Tokyo

My time is coming to an end, here in Tokyo.

I am saying goodbye to many of my friends I met here. One of my best buddies, Katsu (my travel buddy in my Bali posts) and I had a casual fair well dinner at a narrow Okonomiyaki joint in Asakusa, Tokyo.

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Beautiful Sky Tree in the background
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Edo-dori cross streets
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Jinrikisha in Asakusa, men pull you in these carts like old Edo era
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Interesting bar I’d like to go to
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Kind of traditional looking subway exit?

Okonomiyaki is a traditional food from Osaka. Monjyayaki is the Tokyo-equivalent, but in my opinion not as good because it is a little goopy looking. In translated menus, I think they are described as ‘Savory Pancake’. What?? Haha, Okonomiyak has two different varieties from Osaka and Hiroshima. One uses noodles, the other uses flour. The noodle filled Okonomiyaki is too filling for me. The positive side of this carby food is that there is a lot of cabbage as well as other vegetables. You can choose different meats and fillings, and then make it on the grill in front of you! In the Asakusa district in Tokyo, Okonomiyaki, Tenpanyaki, Manjuu, Melon Pan (bread), and Match Ice Cream and the hits in Asakusa!

We wandered around the old district.

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I love signs like these
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Kaminarimon, Thunder gate, guarded by two gods
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Tourist shot!
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Walking down the main souvenier street called Nakamisedori
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Manjuu! Fried dough ball with red bean paste. Delicious!
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feels festive

How to eat Okonomiyaki

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1. Take Picture. 2. MIX!
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Mixing like a true Japanese!
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3. Add oil. 4. Pour on grill in pancake shape (optional). 5. Flip!
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6. Add SAUCE! 7. ADD MAYO! 8. Add NORI! 9. Add Fish Flakes! 10. EAT!
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11. Order dessert ;D
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New Years decorations

Katsu has been such a great friend of mine during my year and a half stay in Tokyo. We did many things together, such as listening to Jazz at The Jazz Hub in Asakusa, eating yakitori, yakiniku, going to Odaiba, and of course traveling to Bali and Jakarta together!

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He’s the man

We enjoyed the quiet peacefulness of Asakusa in the evening. It has such a different feel than in the daytime when the loads of tourists are absolutely everywhere.

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This alley feels like Old Edo
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Nice artwork on closed shops garage-like doors
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Tacky souvenir shops closed! Hooray!
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Approaching Sensoji
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Tourist Shot number 2

We prayed at the temple. We went souvenier shopping at Don Quijote. We made fun of the fish in the fish tank.

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Japanese Walmart, in my eyes
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Tourist shot number 3
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Souvenir Magnets
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Make your own ramen shop! out of paper!
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Gochira!!
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dareda?
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OJIISAN FUGU!

We will definitely meet again, my friend.Next summer, Okinawa?

Where’s your favorite place in Tokyo? I’d love to hear your comments! If you enjoyed this post, please subscribe and like it! Thanks! 

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2 thoughts on “Eating Okonomiyaki in Asakusa, Tokyo

  1. Despite staying in Asakusa I really didn’t explore it enough. I was far to bust heady to more colourful districts like Shibuya and Harajuku, which seems a bit of a shame in hindsight. But I did try okonomiyaki and absolutely loved it! I didn’t get to cook it myself though.

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